Tag Archives: #RugbyUnited

What Recent Developments May Mean for Welsh Rugby

“I don’t like the central control thing, I don’t necessarily believe in it. The way I look at it is there are things that make sense to do together and things that it makes sense to stay well away from.” WRU CEO Martyn Phillips during WalesOnLine Interview with Simon Thomas 5th January 2017

It came as a bit of a surprise this week to hear that the WRU are apparently planning a takeover of the struggling Dragons outfit, in light of the above comments only a couple of months ago.

They shouldn’t be taken in isolation I suppose.  The interview was headlined “WRU boss Martyn Phillips gives his blunt verdict on 16 Big issues facing the future of Welsh rugby.”  Number 5, of the Big Issues was The Regions.

It was encouraging to read a positive take on the relationship as it stands now.  Phillips spoke of a new trust leading to “grittier conversations” and said interestingly, “with trust comes compassionate ruthlessness.”

Of course, the honesty mentioned is a plus following the toxic circumstances of Roger Lewis’s time in the hot seat. By the time he had departed there was no sort of relationship at all between the clubs and the Union.  It’s a path well-trodden, but Lewis’s obsession with clearing the Stadium debt, and investing any spare money into the National team almost led the game to destruction.

It’s perfectly fair to observe that there was no movement on development of the four Professional teams for at least the last three years of Lewis’ tenure. Most of that time was spent haggling over the new Rugby Services Agreement, a document that is so juvenile in its make-up, neither party is willing to make it available for public viewing.

This in stark contrast to the agreement English Clubs have with the RFU and is an extremely sad state of affairs.  There is a sense that across the border the two groups are working together without being too constrained by the agreement, but it’s there in the background. The woefully low compensation for the clubs for International player release contributes to the struggles of the four teams.

This weekend, only the Ospreys have had players released to them for vital Pro12 matches. However some of the players retained have no chance of selection for the Ireland game on Friday night. It’s an appalling situation, that has not resulted in the proper questioning of a system that is not contributing anything to the growth of the sides trying to progress in the domestic competition.

The 6th big issue Phillips addressed centred on certain comments made earlier in the month by Cardiff Chairman Peter Thomas regarding the future of the Pro Teams in Wales. In an interview with Simon Thomas on 3rd January 2017, Peter Thomas made some startling statements.   When asked about the state of Pro Rugby in Wales at the time his response was

We all realise there has to be major change for the professional game in Wales because as we sit and speak the car crash is about to happen and Rome is burning. We recognise this and we have to make the changesWe all realise we can not compete in either the Pro12 or Europe when we are working on squad costs of £4m to £5m while the Irish and the Scots are at £6.5m to £7m and the English clubs are up at £8m. In fairness to the Welsh Rugby Union, they understand this. If we want to win titles, we have to change what we have got because what we have got is not working. That’s what I mean when I say Rome is burning.”

On the question of how to address the financial imbalance, Peter Thomas again referred to the improved relationship and talked of embarking on a new “set-up for pro rugby in Wales.”  He also mentioned the resurrection of the Professional Rugby Game Board  a joint venture between Regional Rugby Wales and the WRU, that was set up under Lewis but met only once, before it was unsurprisingly shelved.

Later in the interview asked if the funding system needed tweeking Pete Thomas said “It needs changing and we are in the process of putting those changes into place.”

Throughout the interview though, the Cardiff Chairman seemed keen to emphasise the necessity of four Pro Teams being in place, though not in what guise, being as strong they possibly could be, with the intention of a Welsh team winning the European Cup within the next ten years.

This brings us back to the initial question of the Newport Gwent Dragons.  The 8th issue of the interview with Martyn Phillips was concerned with the Dragons.  “What would a well run, successful professional team look like?  We are not where we want to be with the Dragons, but it’s my job to help it get there.”

A pretty damning statement in fairness and Phillips went further. It goes on. “You couldn’t say no to (to the WRU taking the Dragons over)….If it came to that we’d have to look at it and whether we could afford it, but my view is that professional rugby clubs going forward have to have a combination of union funding and private investment.”

Now, this whole piece is based on the premise that the Dragons’ story which broke this week is accurate.  If it is, what has changed in two months in terms of the feasibility of taking over the Dragons?  It seems to me that if the Union does consider it feasible, there would have been some serious investigation already underway at the time of the original interview, as Phillips doesn’t look like the sort of man to shoot from the lip, unlike his predecessor.

Further questions immediately come to mind How would that move look?  Would it be long term?  Peter Thomas’ ideas of greater co-operation, and the suggestion of improved funding streams suggest that there are concerted efforts to alter the whole set-up in the Pro game in Wales.  There’s no talk of an amendment to the Rugby Services Agreement.  Surely, that would be the way forward if that’s what is desired. But if not why not?

Martyn Phillips asserted that central control was not his favoured model, but now, within months, there is a plan to take control of one of the Pro teams.

I’m not necessarily a fan of central control.  Of course, Ireland and more recently Glasgow have been successful domestically under that system, but Wales’s pro game would be a hybrid model: three clubs funded under the RSA and the fourth getting their share, plus a little bit on top. Why should the other teams sit back and accept this apparent unfairness? And equally important, where would the money come from to make both the purchase and operation of the Dragons a success?

The impression I get from all of this, is that there is a movement to massively alter the way rugby is administered in Wales.  In Ireland, it’s already been mentioned that the money is running dry, and the four Provinces need to start attracting some private investment to keep the system working.

I feel that the reverse may well be under way here in Wales.  More control will be ceded centrally, which will change the landscape of the whole game.  There’s plenty more in the Martyn Phillips’ interview worth discussing, especially relating to the involvement of the Valleys, and it may be what was not said by the WRU man may well be more pertinent than what actually was.

Welsh Management Floundering

“Gatland said had he quit after the 2015 tournament, he would have left the job “half done. He told BBC Radio 5 live: “There’s a group of players who honestly believe they are capable of winning the World Cup in 2015… so that’s hugely exciting.” BBC Sport website, 16th December 2013

It’s not that unusual because Wales have done something very similar with Warren Gatland. Lancaster has barely put a foot wrong in his three years in charge so far, but it is still a pretty massive show of faith in Lancaster and his coaches to say that whatever happens in the World Cup next year, and even if the World Cup is a disaster, you are still the man to take us through to the next one.” Chris Jones, BBC Sport website 1st October 2014

“I ultimately accept and take responsibility for the team’s performance,” said Lancaster. BBC Sport Website 11th November 2015

Currently, Wales are apparently attempting an evolution of playing style.  Some might say it needs to be a revolution, so far have Wales fallen behind the best nations in the World, but I’ll stick with evolution.

Its not an easy thing to do in some ways, so one would expect all hands on deck.  However, the captain of the ship, Warren Gatland, is off on B&I Lions’ duty.  Recently, he’s apparently been informing any who would like to hear that he’s having an easy time of it, attending lots of meals to satisfy the sponsors, and putting in an appearance at the odd match, so his face is seen by the cameras.

When you hear that has been said, as a fan of Wales that may get the blood boiling somewhat.  Of course, satisfying sponsors is vitally important on a tour that gives the opposition a sight more than it gives the Home Unions, but it needs paying for.

Considering the man left in charge is Rob Howley, one wonders even more about 1)the Wisdom of Roger Lewis extending Warren Gatland’s contract in 2013 for do long 2)Having a free reign to join the Lions’ coaching team should he be asked, written into his new, huge, contract 3) The wisdom of allowing Gatland to reappoint his coaching team en bloc, even though recent results prior to the reappointments, after 2013 have been far from inspiring.

But that is the situation we are left with and one that is unlikely to change soon.  I’ve never been a huge fan of Rob Howley.  He was backs coach for the Cardiff Blues and the team didn’t progress overly much, in fact you could say it went backwards.  Since joining Wales he has been at the mercy of Warren Gatland – and him still being there, you can draw the conclusion that he is doing exactly what is being asked of him.

I do feel a little sorry for him at present though. A caretaker coach, which is what Howley is doing at the moment, is normally in a position where he has a genuine opportunity to stake a claim for a job. He’s usually not a seat warmer.  He has the chance to put his own stamp on things, and impress the players with his fresh ideas and his employers too.

He doesn’t have that now.  From what we are aware of, Gatland returns after the Lions.  Therefore, Howley is in a very awkward position.  He cant, even if he is capable, enter the fray with brand new ideas and dazzle the players. This is into the 10th year of management for him and his second spell as caretaker.  Unless there is an elaborate ploy to hide the fact Gatland is on his way after June, all Howley is doing is putting into play the work that Gatland will continue on his return.  He has to, there is no other way.

This all leaves us with the question of whether Gatland’s ideas are good enough for modern rugby.  On past evidence, the overwhelming answer to that is no. We haven’t won a Championship since 2013.  We have not regularly beaten a team on top of their game when it really matters, with the exception of the “Rorke’s Drift” re-enactment against Ireland at the Principality Stadium two years ago.

Injuries or not, the World Cup exit was an indictment of the poor tactics we have been lumbered with for too long under Gatland and Howley. We beat a poorly managed England, but lost to Australia, who weren’t on top of their game at that stage, and were down to 13 men during the game.  We also lost to South Africa who have been in decline for some time.

The situation we are in is a direct result of that contract renewal for Gatland, and then allowing him to re-appoint his trusty lieutenants.  It’s a very sad state of affairs that the players he said believed were capable of winning a World Cup are being made to look more and more ordinary the longer they play for Wales.

Its also very sad that either the WRU are unable to pay off the coaching team that are driving the National team into the ground, or they believe there is no reason for a change.  I really hope it is the former. Contrast how England dealt with Lancaster after the World Cup. Its time to listen to the fans who watch and have watched the game year in year out, not just the eventers, valuable as they are to the sport.

Too many of my friends are walking away from the International game, and are doubting their support for the Pro game too, because of the lack of professionalism in the administration of that sport.  The game is approaching a crossroads, I just hope those in charge act quick enough before it’s too late.

SIX NATIONS PREVIEW PART 2: ENGLAND

Stuart Lancaster file photo
Lancaster was never able to quite hit the heights

Near the top of the list for many successful coaches , especially here in the Northern Hemisphere, is the conundrum of how to handle expectation. The favourites tag hangs heavy on many a team, and it could be said, none more so than the England team coached by Stuart Lancaster.

The most momentous result in English Rugby’s history is still fairly fresh in the memory. Indeed, England’s World Cup win in 2003, preceded by a Six Nations Grand Slam, attracted many new fans to the sport in England, and heightened expectation for all future teams and coaches.  “Do it once and you can do it again, and again,” or so it’s believed.

In truth, that team coached by Sir Clive Woodward was ground breaking.  However, he probably totally messed it up for future coaches – a common theme of mine is many NH teams don’t take to winning well.  It seems to be tough for those other than the very best to know that when you are at the top you cant stand still, you have to keep evolving.

That level of expectation was a problem for all Sir Clive’s predecessors and was still being felt when, under the radar somewhat, and to the protestations of many, Stuart Lancaster took over as caretaker coach for the 2012 Six Nations.

Results didn’t meet expectations

The Six Nations is unique in the way the tournament is set up.  There isn’t a home and away format.  There is an uneven spread of matches – one year it’s 3 home games and two away, and the next vice versa.  Coaches know how the games fall each year – for instance Wales have the teams in Blue all either at home or away, with England and Ireland fulfilling the opposite fixtures, and its always been so.

With the exception of Wales in 2012, the games that Lancaster’s England lost were all games away from home. In the proceeding 3 years, Wales (Round 5), France (Round 2) and Ireland (Round 3) all beat England at times when expectation was high or just when momentum was gathering.

4 years as Runners Up for England in this tournament didn’t really meet expectations – still high some nine years and more after November 2003. In the three Autumn Series under Lancaster he had recorded a huge win vs New Zealand in 2012, and two wins vs Australia.  On Summer tours, the only win recorded was on the Lions’ decimated tour of Argentina in 2013.

A 2-0 loss to South Africa and a 3-0 loss to New Zealand were tales of “what could have been,” with the draw in South Africa in 2013 painting a picture of false hope.

World Cup Woe and a New Coach

 

France v England - 2016 RBS Six Nations - Stade de France
Sorely missed centre Manu Tuilagi

All of this doom and gloom, and no mention of the 2015 World Cup? England entered that competition in fairly good shape.  Of course, it was described as “their World Cup” – it was on home soil, and consequently, many thought it was theirs to win too.

In England’s group, were Wales and Australia.   England had beaten Wales in the 2014 and 2015 Six Nations.  They had beaten Australia in the 2013 and 2014 Autumn series.  But really the build-up to the tournament wasn’t great.

There was no real succession planning for the injury prone Manu Tuilagi – a barnstorming centre who had torn the All Blacks to shreds in 2012.  England had used many different centre combinations, without settling on a steady combination, with injuries and form of the alternatives being a grave concern.

Chris Robshaw’s position at 7 was a real cause for debate.  As is usual, the British Press had begun to obsess about the concept of a “genuine 7” a guy who was strong over the ball, a carrier and a link between forwards and backs.  Lancaster had firmly nailed his colours to the mast and said that his captain was his 7, was more than capable of playing the role and would remain at 7 come what may,

On top of that, Graham Rowntree had come out and said he was coach of a “World Class Pack” but was looking to improve their all round ability with ball in hand.  The bench-mark from which he was working was the All Black forwards who were capable of Harlem Globetrotter-esque skills on times in some eyes. That was a mistake.

Throw into the mix the selection of Sam Burgess, cross-code convert who had been bought by Bath, but who was considered a back row player by his club, but a midfield star by England and the signs weren’t great.

History Maker

The rest they say is history.  Roll forward to November 2015 and England appoint their first foreign coach in Eddie Jones.  And what a success he has made of the job so far. England’s last World Cup game was against Uruguay, and a resounding 60-3 victory, heralding the beginning of 14 games unbeaten, the next 13 of them under Eddie Jones.

2017 RBS 6 Nations Package
Few would have imagined this picture after England’s 2015 or the follow up

He’s quite obviously not everyone’s cup of tea for sure.  And most certainly he hasn’t yet turned England into world beaters.  But, even the most bitter non-England fan can only stand back and admire his achievements. A resounding Grand Slam – the first in 13 years at the first attempt.  A 3-0 series win against Australia, in Australia.

A 4 wins from 4 Autumn series win – with victories against Australia and South Africa,  and against Argentina, playing with 14 men for much of the game.  All on the back of a pretty awful 2015 season.

What has been striking about his time in charge is his desire not to allow the team to get ahead of themselves. After every milestone, there was no looking back, only forward.  No real celebrations, although I’m sure they enjoyed the occasion.  The Australian tour, the same. (I would say that was tarnished by some unsavoury sparring with Australian coach Michael Cheika – but stoked by some pretty unsavoury “plants” at press conferences by the Australian media too.)


Forwards

Nathan Catt (Bath Rugby), Jack Clifford (Harlequins), Dan Cole (Leicester Tigers), Charlie Ewels (Bath Rugby), Ellis Genge (Leicester Tigers), Jamie George (Saracens), Teimana Harrison (Northampton Saints), Dylan Hartley (Northampton Saints), James Haskell (Wasps), Nathan Hughes (Wasps), Maro Itoje (Saracens), George Kruis (Saracens), Joe Launchbury (Wasps), Courtney Lawes (Northampton Saints), Joe Marler (Harlequins), Matt Mullan (Wasps), Kyle Sinckler (Harlequins), Tommy Taylor (Wasps), Mike Williams (Leicester Tigers), Tom Wood (Northampton Saints).

Backs

Mike Brown (Harlequins), Danny Care (Harlequins), Elliot Daly (Wasps), Owen Farrell (Saracens), George Ford (Bath Rugby), Jonathan Joseph (Bath Rugby), Alex Lozowski (Saracens), Jonny May (Gloucester Rugby), Jack Nowell (Exeter Chiefs), Henry Slade (Exeter Chiefs), Ben Te’o (Worcester Warriors), Anthony Watson (Bath Rugby), Marland Yarde (Harlequins), Ben Youngs (Leicester Tigers).


Resurgent England

What’s also impressive is how the bones of the squad picked by Lancaster at the World Cup and the Six Nations Squad picked by Jones is similar too.  Of the 34 picked for this Six Nations, half were in the World Cup Squad. At least three more, in the Vunipola Brothers and Chris Robshaw would have been selected too, barring injury.

As I mentioned yesterday, Jones’ emphasis currently is on establishing a platform – effective and powerful scrum, lineout and defence are crucial to any successful team.  Back to the All Blacks once more, but at the heart of their success has been a decent platform in these areas.  Not wholly so, especially recently, as they have, in truth, become a counter-attacking team in many ways, feeding off turnovers and errors in the opposition, but it’s still a major part of their game.

As I also mentioned, this is a particularly English mentality.  This is not to say that it makes a team boring,  Far from it.  Being confident in your team’s ability to win your lineouts, especially at crucial phases of the game, is a beautiful thing.  Knowing that your team is confident at scrum time, and is even capable of disrupting the opposition scrum, often regularly, equally so.

But apparently, this is a fact not to the liking of Lions’ legend Jim Telfer, who has become the vox box of foolishness in recent times.  A quick google of his pronouncements, especially at this time of yearprovides painful reading, though. Just have a read of this little nugget.

“Eddie Jones doesn’t want to beat teams, he wants to demolish them, which I find a bit disappointing,” Telfer told BBC Sport. “To me he’s building his whole team on set piece and the building of the attack comes secondary.”

Of course, England aren’t purring in attack at the moment, but this gem contradicts everything Jones has said recently.  It raises some serious questions about Telfer’s mindset too.  I’ve never known a team approach an opposition by saying “let’s go easy on these folks, we don’t want to hurt their feelings. Give ’em a chance at scrum time, otherwise we might overwhelm them.  We can’t have that”

One might want to look at his coaching philosophy when on the ’97 Lions’ tour too.  Total opposite to the above.  He picked a pack to ask questions of “the manhood” of the South African forwards his winning team faced.

We all know the motivation for his rant – a proud Scotsman facing an English side on the up once more. Say no more though, read the article and bin it as utter nonsense.  He has previous and doesn’t do himself any justice here.

This is what Europe and the Rugby World are facing once more.  The prospect of an England team capable of challenging the very best. I think that really scares people and the old prejudices rise to the surface when that happens.

It’s obvious that the coach is in the heads of the players he has selected.  England will face challenges along the way – first up France, then Wales at home.  But they aren’t insurmountable, especially for a side that has won 3 on the bounce in Australia.  That’s the way Woodward built his sides – taking  them to places they had never been before, and winning, so those more familiar challenges lost some of their fear and became the norm.

We’ve certainly been along this road before with England sides of recent memory – built up in the media only to stumble, but for me there is a different feel to this side. It has the feel of winners.  I may well be proved wrong as early as Saturday evening, who knows.  But for those who enjoy England falling flat on their face, preparations should be made for a difficult 7 weeks.

Winning that “Grand Slam” decider on the last Saturday may well be a step too far.  Record breaking occasions – England could well beat the record for most consecutive wins for the Top Nations – are notoriously difficult to negotiate.  I wouldn’t put it past them though.